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Just a quick post to let Eastern Shore Gardeners (and ones from the Western Shore, too!) know that I’ll be signing copies of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping at this year’s Kent Island Day.  That’s today from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. I’ve never been before, but it looks like a fun event! Hope to see some of you there.

I was honored to be asked to do a video interview about Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping, for The Chestertown Spy. Here it is for readers who don’t get the Spy. Below, I’ve added a photo that illustrates one my other overwhelming interests!

Barbara-and-Dogs

Above: Front row: Bienn and Bonnie. Back row: Bing, Casey, Me, and puppy Charlie.

Spring was late this year, to be sure, but in recent weeks the pace has picked up considerably in my garden. This morning, I am sharing a few spring plant combinations. For the most part, my spring combinations depend on self-sowing perennials such as wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata) and Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginiana). I am also seeing self-sown plants of great merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora) that are just getting large enough to bloom. My division of this early blooming wildflower originally came from my mother’s garden.

Later today, I hope to see some Eastern Shore Gardeners at Twigs & Teacups in Chestertown, Maryland, for First Friday. I’ll be at the store from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. signing books, answering questions, and talking about gardens. Also, don’t forget to come to the plant sales next Friday at Fountain Park in Chestertown and Saturday in Rock Hall! Both sales begin at 9:00 a.m., and you will find a number of the plants pictured here among the offerings!

Uvularia-grandiflora,Sangui

Above: Favorite spring flowers, taken April 17. Great merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora), double bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis ‘Flore Pleno’), and Dutchmen’s breeches (Dicentra cucularia)

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I hope some readers of Eastern Shore Gardener will join me at Adkins Arboretum this Friday or Saturday. Adkins is celebrating the opening day for their native plant nursery, and I’ll be there to sign copies of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping. There’s little doubt I’ll be buying some plants as well.

I will be signing books on both Friday and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Bring questions, too, and I will do my best to answer them!

Dodecatheon.jpg

Adkins Arboretum is located at 12610 Eve Road, Ridgely, MD 21660
Phone: 410-634-2847

For more on the event see Native Plant Nursery Opening.

I had lots of fun at the American Horticultural Society’s Spring Garden Market on April 10 & 11 (Friday and Saturday). I am quite sure that I told a few people that I will be at Adkins Arboretum’s Spring Nursery Opening and Plant Sale, but I had the dates wrong yesterday. (I am blaming the fact that I didn’t check my calendar.) Anyway, I will be at Adkins Arboretum next weekend on Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. if you would like a signed copy of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping. Hope to see you there!

I am packing my car this morning to get ready to go to Alexandria, Virginia, for the American Horticultural Society’s Spring Garden Market. I will be selling and signing copies of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping. Hope to see some of you there! Here are the details:

Friday, April 11 & 12, 2015
American Horticultural Society’s Spring Garden Market
Members’ Only Morning, Friday, April 10,  10:00 a.m.- 12:00 noon
Public Sale: Friday, April 10, 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 11, 10 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
7931 East Boulevard Drive
Alexandria, VA 22308

For more information on the market, see Spring Garden Market. CGL-Cover005_thumb.jpg

Six Tips

Months ago, the University of North Carolina Press asked me to write two blog posts that relate to Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping. The first of them was published today, and I wanted to share a link to it here on Eastern Shore Gardener. Six Tips for Creating an Eco-friendly Landscape, outlines the fundamental principles covered in the book that help create a sustainable landscape. Each principle offers many options for implementation. Chapter One presents ten tips for each principle that gardeners can use to move toward a beautiful, sustainable landscape.

Since it looks like spring is really finally here, I am spending the afternoon outdoors cleaning up beds and replenishing the leaf litter on the garden. The simple act of mulching works toward several principles. It is especially important for #4, Manage Water Runoff, but it also is an essential part of principle #6, Garden Wisely, because of all the benefits mulch brings to soil, weed control, and more. I wait until spring to clean up and cut down, because deep leaf litter and stems provide overwintering sites for insects and good hunting grounds for birds. All the stems and other plant parts pulled off the garden in spring go directly to the compost pile, and eventually are returned to the garden to complete the cycle.

If you don’t already have a copy of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping, consider coming to one of the events listed in the calendar. Adkins Arboretum has copies available by mail. It is also available from Amazon.

Uvularia-grandiflora

Above: Large-flowered bellwort (Uvularia grandiflora) is finally beginning to emerge from the soil. It brings yellow spring flowers and handsome foliage to the garden.

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