Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Plants for shade’

Although it is dreary and rainy today, I am happy because we are getting some much-needed rain. Rain or shine, this time of year my garden looks both wonderful and riotous. I thought I would share a picture of what the front garden looks like this week, plus shots of a couple major players.

Garden-April-2017

Above: Wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata) in shades of purple and white fill the garden this time of year. Phlox self sows and pops up in shady parts of the front garden as well as the areas (toward the foreground) that receive a good amount of sun, meaning 6 or 7 hours of direct sun per day.

 

Aquilegia-Little-Lanterns

Above: I love full size wild columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) and have it everywhere in the garden, since it is a generous self-seeder. The plant above is ‘Little Lanterns’ (A. canadensis ‘Little Lanterns’) a dwarf cultivar that is 10 to 12 inches tall, self sows, and reliably comes true from seed.

Erigeron

Above: This is one of my new favorites: Robin’s plantain (Erigeron pulchellus ‘Lynnhaven Carpet’). Plants are currently covered with cheerful yellow and white daisies that arise from ground-hugging rosettes of gray-green leaves. Flowers are maybe 8 to 10 inches tall, but the leaves are only about 2 or 3 inches tall. (If it wasn’t raining right this minute, I would go out and measure!) This native species thrives in part shade to shade, tolerates a wide range of conditions, and spreads to form a nice, dense carpet.

The purple leaves in the photograph above are purple Japanese parsley (Cryptotanea japonica ‘Purpurea). They self sow and pop up here and there. I love the rich color of their leaves. (I don’t think they are edible despite the common name.) I was planting a garden at a friend’s house this morning in the rain, and I realized that some of them had piggy-backed their way to her a year or so ago with divisions of other plants.

Enjoy the rain!

Read Full Post »

As always, my garden is speeding along this spring, and I am just barely keeping up. Today’s post features a couple of plants that have been especially spectacular this spring. I don’t take much credit for the display. All do their thing without any intervention from me.

For the past couple of weeks, the front garden is all about our native wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata). I started with a handful of small plants that rode down with us years ago from Pennsylvania. These easy and accommodating wildflowers self sow, and I brought down plants in a range of colors in shades of lavender and lilac-blue to white. This spring, the front garden is filled with great clumps in a full range of shades. There also are some deep purples elsewhere in the garden that I am encouraging to sow around. I simply can’t stop looking at them, plus wild blue phlox has a delightful light fragrance as long as the weather is not too windy.

Phlox-in-spring

Above: Wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata.

Wild blue phlox thrives in partial shade to partial sun, and tolerates evenly moist to somewhat dry soil. The seedlings appear in surprising spots and are always welcome!

(more…)

Read Full Post »

I am always on the lookout for perennials that are able to withstand summertime heat and humidity and still look great as the growing season wanes. This year one of the late-season standouts is hosta ‘Dick Ward’. Despite the drought this summer, coupled with neglectful watering, it remains attractive well into October.

Hosta-Dick-Ward

Above. Hosta ‘Dick Ward’ in the third week of October. The clump is about 19 inches tall and 25 inches wide.

While the foliage color is certainly fading, and there are a couple of browned-out leaf edges, all-in-all ‘Dick Ward’ remains quite attractive. Earlier in the season, the leaves were bright green with darker green margins.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

I left the Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trades Show (MANTS) in Baltimore last week with a deep case of plant lust. This is a serious problem on a number of levels, not the least of which is the fact that it’s beastly cold and snowy outside—hardly the season for planting.

Normally, I come away from such shows with lists of annuals and perennials I’d like to try. The lust for these beauties is easily satisfied, since it’s a relatively simple matter to find garden space for them. This year, however, a couple species of native shrubs and trees grabbed my attention. Finding room for them is another matter altogether.

Hydrangea-quercifolia

Above: Oakleaf hydrangea with daylily ‘Patricia Fay’.

Oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) has been in every garden I’ve ever had, and the MANTS show renewed my my interest in this handsome native shrub. For those of you who don’t know it, it is a deciduous, summer-blooming shrub that also features fabulous fall color and attractive exfoliating bark. Plants range from 6 to 8 or more feet tall. They spread by suckers, and Michael Dirr (Manual of Woody Landscape Plants) estimates the spread at 10 to 12 or more feet wide.

(more…)

Read Full Post »