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Posts Tagged ‘Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping’

I will be speaking to the Cape St Claire Garden Club, Tuesday, June 6th at 7:00 p.m., at Cape St Claire Clubhouse, 1223 River Bay Road, Annapolis, MD, 21409. The public is invited, and I hope some  Eastern Shore Gardener readers can join us!

My topic for the evening is Greener Gardens: One Step at a Time. I’ll be discussing options for creating landscapes that are more sustainable. Ideas range from simple steps to ambitious projects any gardener or homeowner can undertake. The goal is beautiful gardens and landscapes that are attractive and healthy for humans, wildlife, pets, and the environment as a whole. My focus is on  the Chesapeake Bay and all its tributaries.

Admission is free. I will have copies of my books, Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping and How to Prune Trees & Shrubs for sale, which I will happily sign after the talk.

I am looking forward to it, and I hope to see some of you there!

Hosta-Hydrangea-2017

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I will be speaking to a small group in Snow Hill, Maryland,  on Saturday, April 8 at 10:00 a.m. I hope some Eastern Shore Gardener readers can join us! The talk is hosted by the Lower Shore Land Trust, 100 River Street, Snow Hill. There are still seats available. I will be speaking about Building Diversity in the Garden.

Cost is $15 (money raised supports the land trust!). You can also pay $40 for registration plus a copy of my book, Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping, which I will happily sign after the talk. Reservations are required, and you can Register online today or RSVP at 443-234-5587. Limited seating!

I am looking forward to it, and I hope to see some of you there!

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Scarlet buckeye (Aesculus pavia)

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A couple of days ago I was returning from running errands, and spotted a family of turkeys in our yard. They were strolling through a group of trees along the driveway that I hope one day will resemble a woods. As they slipped into the tangle of vegetation, it reminded me how much progress I’ve made over the years replacing lwangrass with more wildlife-friendly plantings. This woodsy area is still far from beautiful, but it does now host a variety of native trees and shrubs that I have planted over the years. In the interest of full disclosure, it is also the site of one of my major wineberry battles earlier this summer.

I keep a list of birds I have spotted on the property, and this isn’t the first time I have seen turkeys here. (In addition to being a gardener, I am a birder, so I am usually always looking.) Still, it has been fun to follow this family all summer and plan what else I can add to the landscape that will make it friendlier to an even wider variety of creatures.

Yellow-billed-Cukoo

Above: Yellow-Billed Cuckoo, one of the many species spotted at Hackberry Point.

Come September, I will certainly add more natives for birds and other wildlife, and I hope many other Eastern Shore Gardeners will do the same. To help get you planning and planting, I wanted to share a link to 10 Tips for Attracting Birds to Your Landscape, a blog post I wrote for the University of North Carolina Press in support of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping earlier this year. I hope you enjoy it!

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I was honored to be asked to do a video interview about Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping, for The Chestertown Spy. Here it is for readers who don’t get the Spy. Below, I’ve added a photo that illustrates one my other overwhelming interests!

Barbara-and-Dogs

Above: Front row: Bienn and Bonnie. Back row: Bing, Casey, Me, and puppy Charlie.

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Spring was late this year, to be sure, but in recent weeks the pace has picked up considerably in my garden. This morning, I am sharing a few spring plant combinations. For the most part, my spring combinations depend on self-sowing perennials such as wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata) and Virginia bluebells (Mertensia virginiana). I am also seeing self-sown plants of great merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora) that are just getting large enough to bloom. My division of this early blooming wildflower originally came from my mother’s garden.

Later today, I hope to see some Eastern Shore Gardeners at Twigs & Teacups in Chestertown, Maryland, for First Friday. I’ll be at the store from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. signing books, answering questions, and talking about gardens. Also, don’t forget to come to the plant sales next Friday at Fountain Park in Chestertown and Saturday in Rock Hall! Both sales begin at 9:00 a.m., and you will find a number of the plants pictured here among the offerings!

Uvularia-grandiflora,Sangui

Above: Favorite spring flowers, taken April 17. Great merrybells (Uvularia grandiflora), double bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis ‘Flore Pleno’), and Dutchmen’s breeches (Dicentra cucularia)

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I hope some readers of Eastern Shore Gardener will join me at Adkins Arboretum this Friday or Saturday. Adkins is celebrating the opening day for their native plant nursery, and I’ll be there to sign copies of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping. There’s little doubt I’ll be buying some plants as well.

I will be signing books on both Friday and Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Bring questions, too, and I will do my best to answer them!

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Adkins Arboretum is located at 12610 Eve Road, Ridgely, MD 21660
Phone: 410-634-2847

For more on the event see Native Plant Nursery Opening.

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I had lots of fun at the American Horticultural Society’s Spring Garden Market on April 10 & 11 (Friday and Saturday). I am quite sure that I told a few people that I will be at Adkins Arboretum’s Spring Nursery Opening and Plant Sale, but I had the dates wrong yesterday. (I am blaming the fact that I didn’t check my calendar.) Anyway, I will be at Adkins Arboretum next weekend on Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. if you would like a signed copy of Chesapeake Gardening & Landscaping. Hope to see you there!

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